International Janitorial Cleaning Services Association

IJCSA does not use FB and suggests services do not use Facebook paid business advertising services either. If you are starting a cleaning or janitorial business and think that Facebook will get you profitable cleaning clients, YOU ARE WRONG!  

IJCSA does recommend never paying Mr. Zuckerberg again by using your personal free FB account & posting specials and tidbits about your company to local groups in your area. This free way of advertising your business does show proven results. You can use these free groups to direct consumers to your website for more information about your products and services. Using the FB free group method insures that you will not be trapped in the never ending cycle of paying Facebook all your hard earned profit forever.


How Does Facebook Paid Advertising Really Work? - Watch Video 



So You Want A FB Business Page? Do You Have A Budget Of 344 Million Dollars? 

What results will you have on your Facebook social media campaign?

Today in this quick post we will look at the online success of Angie`s List and their Facebook social media campaign. Angie`s List might not be the best example of how to run a Facebook business page for a small to medium sized business owner because they have 344 million dollars and 1500+ employees to manage their social media but.... it will give most business owners who have a limited budget and themselves to do the work insight before wasting all that time and money on a social media campaign that will produce no results for their business. 

Angie`s List On Facebook Is Located Here - 220K in followers! Wow! Very Impressive! Now, ask yourself why can`t they get more then 10 likes on a photo? 

If you do not know the answer it is because Angie`s List has fake fans bought from Facebook and fan farms across the web because business pages that are real do not operate that way. Here is an example of a real FB page and the way it is supposed to look & operate. This example is Justin Bieber who has never paid Facebook a dime. Justin averages 1/2 million likes and shares on his posts with 78+ million fans. Why? He has real fans! 

While on Angie`s List and their social media campaign you quickly realize they have fake fans on Twitter & Google+ and if you take a look at those pages you will see pretty much the same results as their Facebook. All fake! Makes you wonder if you can actually trust the reviews on the website when the company itself can not be trusted with their fake social media campaigns. Do you think the 1500+ employees at Angie`s List sit behind the computer all day long writing FAKE reviews? Discuss here.

In conclusion. Multi million dollar corporations can not run a successful Facebook page. If you decide to run your own Facebook business page please at least keep it 100% real & honest! Nobody likes fake anymore and everyone knows a fake FB when they see one. 

Article By: Matthew Carson | IJCSA 

Source: Why Consumer Reports Says You Can`t Trust Angie`s List




THE IJCSA ONE DAY FB CLEANING AD CHALLENGE - Join The Discussion Here


Facebook paid advertising is a complete waste of time for your cleaning or janitorial business and if you want to waste some money and time testing the results of IJCSA here is how you do it: 

1- Create a FB business promotion for one of your cleaning services. Example: New Client Whole House Spring Cleaning Special! $129- One time special cleaning for 3 bedroom homes. Whatever special you create put in a call in or website code. Example: Call or email now mentioning promotion code, SpringCleaning2017 for the discount. 

2- Set your target audience of consumers in your area 35+ of age in well to do areas of your service territory with a budget of $10, $25, $50, $100+ ... or whatever amount of money that you want to donate to Mr. Zuckerberg.

3- Wait till you get a email or phone call for cleaning. Discuss your services with your new potential client and schedule the cleaning appointment. In most cases Step 3 never happens and you just made Mr. Zuckerberg richer! 

4- Repeat Step #2 - Because you think there is a problem with the system or you did not reach your proper target audience.  

5- Wait till you get a email or phone call for cleaning. Discuss your services with your new potential client and schedule the cleaning appointment. In most cases Step 5 never happens and you just made Mr. Zuckerberg even more rich! 

Cleaning and janitorial services will repeat this cycle over and over again wasting hundreds and thousand of dollars. Consumers rarely hire cleaning & janitorial services from Facebook! They find professional companies on IJCSA delivered by Google! Look at how many people come to the IJCSA website and see our directories. - Notice how many Facebook users like IJCSA. Those FB users are not coming from FB! Those 1000 users a day are coming from Google Search!


 




Facebook is 'a waste of time', say cleaning service owners.

Small businesses owners spend on average ten hours a week marketing their companies on social media – but this could be a total waste of time, according to a new study. Thousands of foolish janitorial and cleaning service companies are paying into social media programs expecting immediate results for their companies and not receiving any new work. 

In a survey of 1,000 USA small business owners and directors, almost two-thirds said there was no evidence their social media strategy was having a positive effect. 

Social platforms such as YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook boast more than 1 billion monthly users but marketing activity on these sites had no proven impact on revenues or brand awareness for 78% of respondents, who said they were uncertain, disagreed, or strongly disagreed that social media had been effective for their business. - Source U.S. Chamber Of Commerce

Debbie Daire, owner of Chicago-based cleaning company company Tidy Homes Inc., said that two years of posting to various social media websites including Facebook had resulted in almost no new sales. “I used to spend a long time creating exciting, eye-catching posts for daily reach. But while people may like a picture, it will not translate into a sale or even a click to my website,” she said.

Bob Aspen, owner of Colorado-based janitorial service Jan-Tech, added that web analytics and customer feedback showed that social media posting translated to “no new business”.

Facebook attracted criticism from the small business community when it changed its algorithm to limit the natural reach of posts. To ensure a wide audience for new content on the social platform, businesses now have to pay a minimum of $10 a day to reach their potential market of customers with no proven results of a single phone call or estimate request.  

Matthew Carson | IJCSA 

Related: 50 Steps For Improving Your Cleaning Or Janitorial Business

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Article From Click X: 

Unfortunately, the golden age of promoting your brand on Facebook has now passed, especially if you’re a small business owner. It has become increasingly difficult to reach that audience through the platform and even if you do manage it, getting them to engage is a whole other struggle. If you gain any customers or visitors to your site as a result of Facebook, chances are you will wonder if the time, money and effort were worth it in the end.

In this post we will explain why Facebook is so difficult for small businesses and why it may be more effort than it’s worth.


Source: Click X



 Mark Zuckerberg has earned $4.16 billion last week. (How much of that was losses from cleaning & janitorial service owners?)

The top 5 wealthiest people according to Bloomberg are now as follows:

  1. Jeff Bezos: $104 billion
  2. Bill Gates: $93.3 billion
  3. Warren Buffett: $86.4 billion
  4. Mark Zuckerberg: $76.9 billion
  5. Amancio Ortega: $76.7 billion

Read More





Consumers Find Cleaning & Janitorial Services On Google - Not Facebook!





From Forbes Article: 

In my last four posts I've shared some of the lessons that I've learned from helping set up lullubee.com, a new business that makes and markets kits for making crafts. After we launched the site and figured out how to take orders and ship products, the next task we faced was to get more visitors to the site, and ultimately more sales. In the next few posts I'll cover several of the techniques we implemented, but in this post I'll focus on Facebook FB +0% marketing.

The first thing we did was to set up our Facebook Page, as recommended in Facebooks "Four Steps to Business success on Facebook".

Once you set up your page, you need to get users to visit it and, hopefully, to "like" it. The reason you want people to like your page is that your posts will then appear on that users news feed. Over time this will allow you, according to Facebook, to start "building loyalty and creating opportunities to generate sales." The first method to get likes is to promote it on your own website using Facebook social plugins. As this costs nothing, you may as well do it, but the percentage of visitors that click on these is typically very small. The second is to purchase Facebook Ads that persuade people to visit your page and to like it. The irony of spending money to promote our Facebook page instead of our site was not lost on us.

After some experimentation I was able to create several ads that successfully generated likes on our page at costs that averaged from $0.27 to $0.57 per like. We spent some money and built up several thousand likes, all the while optimizing the campaign to better target likely customers. We justified the expense as it seemed to be analogous to building up a database of email addresses of people that wanted to learn about our site and our products. However, we shortly discovered our error.

Once we started posting on our Facebook page, we were shocked, shocked, to see that not all the users that liked our page were seeing our posts. For example, with over 6,000 likes on our page, a typical post would only be seen by fifty to several hundred people. To reiterate, only 1% to 5% of the people that liked our page saw our posts. If we were justifying our expense as analogous to building a database of emails, then it was a database that only allowed you to access a tiny, randomly selected, subset each time it was used.

Not quite what we had expected.

Facebook, of course, has a solution for this quandary. Unsurprisingly it involves paying Facebook yet again. Next to each post is a small "Promote" button which innocently suggests that for the mere sum of anywhere from $5 to $300, you can have your post reach from 500 to 50,000 people. This is equivalent to paying from $6 to $10 CPM, advertising rates typically paid for premium ad inventory, to have your post appear on the news feeds of people for whom you have already richly paid Facebook once before. Bear in mind that this is just for your post to appear fleetingly on their feed, with no guarantee that they will see it or click on it.

We have done over 20 promotions now at varying costs from $5 to $50, and the results in terms of users actions have been dismal. The effective cost per user action is over $2, and on some campaigns it can even reach $6 or $12. If we only look at "page likes" and "link clicks", and leave out "post likes", "post comments" and "post shares", whose value is even more ephemeral, the cost per action goes up significantly, from $6 to $20 and in some cases $50. Compared to the alternatives, these are unreasonably expensive. Unless Facebook is charging other companies an order of magnitude less than the rates we are seeing, Facebook promotions are simply not a viable option for small businesses.

Our biggest disappointment was our misunderstanding of how Facebook Pages work. Instead of building a database of users that you can contact at will, you are essentially paying Facebook to build a list of people that you can then advertise to.

Facebook, you can't have it both ways. Either ask businesses to pay for likes, or ask businesses to pay for posts. But asking them to pay premium rates for both is unreasonable and drives the cost of marketing on Facebook into the stratosphere. Perhaps this model works for celebrities or famous brands that can build up huge followings organically. But for small businesses that closely track their spending, Facebook Pages in their current incarnation are a bad investment.

The first thing we did was to set up our Facebook Page, as recommended in Facebooks “Four Steps to Business success on Facebook“. Once you set up your page, you need to get users to visit it and, hopefully, to “like” it. The reason you want people to like your page is that your posts will then appear on that users news feed. Over time this will allow you, according to Facebook, to start “building loyalty and creating opportunities to generate sales.” The first method to get likes is to promote it on your own website using Facebook social plugins. As this costs nothing, you may as well do it, but the percentage of visitors that click on these is typically very small. The second is to purchase Facebook Ads that persuade people to visit your page and to like it. The irony of spending money to promote our Facebook page instead of our site was not lost. After some experimentation I was able to create several ads that successfully generated likes on our page at costs that averaged from $0.27 to $0.57 per like. We spent some money and built up several thousand likes, all the while optimizing the campaign to better target likely customers. We justified the expense as it seemed to be analogous to building up a database of email addresses of people that wanted to learn about our site and our products. However, we shortly discovered our error. Once we started posting on our Facebook page, we were shocked, shocked, to see that not all the users that liked our page were seeing our posts. For example, with over 6,000 likes on our page, a typical post would only be seen by fifty to several hundred people. To reiterate, only 1% to 5% of the people that liked our page saw our posts. If we were justifying our expense as analogous to building a database of emails, then it was a database that only allowed you to access a tiny, randomly selected, subset each time it was used.

Source: Forbes




Article from bluekite

Just because “everyone is on Facebook”, doesn’t mean that it’s the right channel to connect with your audience.

Remember, you are competing with babies, puppies and kitties on Facebook. Do people want to see boring updates about your product or service there?

Probably not.

Consider whether your content is something that is interesting, valuable or entertaining. Is it something that will cause people to stop and take a look?

If the answer is no, Facebook might not be the best medium for you.

Source: bluekite


A Little Humor But Startling Facts About Facebook - Warning! Video Does Contain Some Foul Language... but if you are on Facebook you are used to foul language or worst. 




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