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Bloodborne pathogens: Importance of cleaning employees & staff knowing about bloodborne pathogens

28 May 2020 10:17 PM | Roche Brantley

The Importance of cleaning employees & staff knowing about bloodborne pathogens is vital. 5,250 workers died on the job (3.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers) — on average, more than 100 a week or more than 14 deaths every day. In more than four decades, OSHA and state partners, coupled with the efforts of employers, safety and health professionals, unions, and advocates, have had a dramatic effect on workplace safety. Worker deaths in America are down-on average, from about 38 worker deaths a day in 1970 to 14 a day in 2017. Worker injurie are down-from 10.9 incidents per 100 workers in 1972 to 2.8 per 100 in 2017 (OSHA). Enforcing Educational awareness, and Proper Protocol of cleaning employees & staff knowing about bloodborne pathogens is vital.

The enforcement of educational awareness ensure that workers receive regular training that covers all elements of the standard including, but not limited to: information on bloodborne pathogens and diseases, methods used to control occupational exposure, hepatitis B vaccine, and medical evaluation and post-exposure follow-up procedures. Employers must offer this training on initial assignment, at least annually thereafter, and when new or modified tasks or procedures affect a worker’s occupational exposure. Also, HIV and HBV laboratory and production facility workers must receive specialized initial training, in addition to the training provided to all workers with occupational exposure. Workers must have the opportunity to ask the trainer questions.  Also, training must be presented at an educational level and in a language that workers understand (OSHA). All of the requirements of OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard can be found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations at 29 CFR 1910.1030. The standard’s requirements state what employers must do to protect workers who are occupationally exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM), as defined in the standard. That is, the standard protects workers who can reasonably be anticipated to encounter blood or OPIM as a result of doing their job duties. (OSHA)

 

Proper Protocol of cleaning employees & staff knowing about bloodborne pathogens by implementing the use of universal precautions. Treating all human blood and OPIM as if known to be infectious for bloodborne pathogens. Identify and use engineering controls. These are devices that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace. They include sharps disposal containers, needles, and safer medical devices, such as sharps with engineered sharps-injury protection and needleless systems. Identify and ensure the use of work practice controls. These are practices that reduce the possibility of exposure by changing the way a task is performed, such as appropriate practices for handling and disposing of contaminated sharps, handling specimens, handling laundry, and cleaning contaminated surfaces and items. Provide personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, gowns, eye protection, and masks. Employers must clean, repair, and replace this equipment as needed. Provision, maintenance, repair and replacement are at no cost to the worker. (OSHA)

Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms present in blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS. Workers exposed to bloodborne pathogens are at risk for serious or life-threatening illnesses; therefore, it is important for cleaning employees & staff knowing about bloodborne pathogens

 

Citations

https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_BloodborneFacts/bbfact01.pdf


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