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How to stay healthy in a toxin-ridden business

20 Jun 2019 7:20 AM | Alberto Atallah

How to stay healthy in a toxin-ridden business.

It should be noted that there's no way to not be exposed to harmful toxins or bacteria in real life, but there certainly are ways to minimize it. Our bodies are suited to combat these harmful substances and help us heal and grow more immune to them, but repeated exposure and improper care can wear down even the hardiest of people. You could be a healthy individual who exercises, eats right, and takes care of their overall well-being; and still be prone to disease or other complications due to exposure to things you often don't give a second thought...such as common cleaning products that are already in your home. You'll notice many products contain the label "hazardous to humans and animals", and might think, "why would I use this all over my house or office?"

The average household has over 60 toxic chemicals, a claim by environmental experts. These are often found in fragrances or their furniture/counter top cleaners, making people prone to asthma, cancer, and other chemical imbalances in the body. These exposures are more hidden than more direct hazards, like heavy fumes or direct contact with other chemicals. A common harmful substance found in air fresheners an dish soaps, are phthalates. These are considered endocrine disruptors, so men who are exposed to these on a constant basis suffer from reduced sperm counts and other hormonal complications. Since the skin has no protective layer like our organs do, direct contact is much less safe. You can reduce exposure to these by choosing more green options to cleanse the air; such as having plants or lighting a scented candle.

Another harmful substance known as 2-butoxyethanol, is readily available in most window, kitchen, and all-purpose cleaners. The convenience of these items and the fresh, clean feeling they provide after use can be misleading. When you constantly inhale these scents, the body is more prone to lung, liver, and kidney damages. The riskier part is, US Law does not require this chemical to be listed on a product's label. A way to dilute or reduce this chemical's presence, is once again to employ a greener option to clean your windows and kitchen. A mixture of vinegar, oil, and water is an effective, non-threatening solution to leave your glass surfaces sparkling. Washed with a microfiber cloth or even a newspaper, you can rest assured knowing your windows are clean and your organs unharmed.

Ammonia is another one of several common chemicals found in our cleaners. Usually they're found in products that clean bathrooms, sinks, jewelry, as well as glass. Since ammonia evaporates and leaves your glass feeling sparkly and clean, people often don't give it a second thought. Ammonia is a powerful irritant, especially bad for those who suffer from asthma or other lung issues. House cleaners who must do their work can spend hours exposed to this, and even if they suffered no health issues before, they can suddenly spring up in the form of bronchitis or asthma. A viable choice would be to use vodka on any metal surface, as it will produce that shine without the added health risk.

Chlorine, which is used as an antiseptic and disinfectant can be misleading in thinking it is safe. Even when you're in the pool and open your eyes underwater, you can feel the irritation it gives and the distinct red coloring your eyes get after. It's also commonly found in toilet cleaners, laundry whiteners, and mildew removers. The fumes it gives off go to your skin due to proximity, but it's also running in the tap water you brush your teeth with or shower with. The effects can be mild, or chronic, but it's certain that it causes irritation in our breathing. To scrub in an effective and safer manner, try using baking soda and vinegar. A mixture of vinegar and borax powder work well for whitening clothes. To reduce the exposure you get from tap water, consider installing filters on your sinks and showers.

Aside from the few chemicals mentioned earlier, customers really need to be aware of greenwashing. Greenwashing refers to companies or products that label themselves as "green" or "natural" mistakenly leading to believe they are nontoxic. The environmental consulting firm known as TerraChoice Group made up a report called "The Sins of Greenwashing" in which it found more than 95% of "green" consumer products contain at least one or few harmful toxins. Being certified as a green cleaner by the IJCSA is a great step for you as a cleaning business owner, to show your customers you know proper and safe procedures to provide an effective, natural cleaning solution. Check out a green-certified company in this directory:

http://www.ijcsa.org/Green-Cleaning-Services


Source from: https://experiencelife.com/article/8-hidden-toxins-whats-lurking-in-your-cleaning-products/


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